Re: [SystemSafety] Hackers take over *control* of a car wirelessly

From: Peter Bernard Ladkin < >
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2015 20:53:08 +0200


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Concerning Monsieur Musk and Tesla, I think it is a huge mistake to try to argue from alleged traits of a company chief to the quality of the products.

I also think it is a huge mistake to argue from the habits of engineers and scientists to their achievements.

Les claims, I understand from Mike's note, that working 80 hours a week for six months drove him nigh insane. I'll accept that, with the possible caveat concerning "nigh" :-)

I know someone who worked 70-80 hours a week for decades, and who won the Turing prize for his discoveries, and is content doing what he does and being who he is.

My thesis advisor, when he was working on a problem, used to work until he couldn't any more. You could knock on his office door, and he may well have been inside it for 60 or 80 or 100 hours, with excursions to the toilet, and to the food+drink+cigarette store 5 minutes away, but unfortunately not to the showers. His family was used to him not coming home for five days. He solved some of the most intractable problems in the field this way. He was the person who found a mistake in my PhD thesis, which included five published papers in the major conferences in the field. Those reviewers missed my mistake - he didn't.

I worked with someone whose pleasure in life was programming. He had an earpiece telephone to maintain his social contacts while working, and took at least two evenings off per week explicitly to socialise. Else he was at the machine or crashed out. Had a lovely fiancee, also a hard worker but not so hard. And only needed four or five hours sleep a night. He worked on a project I led. One weekend, he called up. "I'm about to work on your task. Here are some questions." Followed about two hours of detailed and insightful questions about the spec. Three days later "here's the code". How long? 60 hours of work. Perfect. Bug free. And, besides, solving a previously-open algorithmic problem.

I'm not like any of those people. Neither, I would guess, are most of the people on this list. Doesn't make anything they did at all questionable.

PBL
Prof. Peter Bernard Ladkin, Faculty of Technology, University of Bielefeld, 33594 Bielefeld, Germany Je suis Charlie
Tel+msg +49 (0)521 880 7319 www.rvs.uni-bielefeld.de

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systemsafety_at_xxxxxx Received on Thu Jul 23 2015 - 20:53:17 CEST

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